Chabad Regains Rights to Krakow Synagogue Before High Holy Days

Judge Jacek Blat of the court of Krakow ruled today that the Izaak synagogue must be returned


Chabad Regains Rights to Krakow Synagogue Before High Holy Days

The Izaak Synagogue is a Prayerhouse built in 1644

by Mussi Sharfstein - Krakow, Poland

September 25, 2019

Krakow, Poland—Judge Jacek Blat of the court of Krakow ruled today that the Izaak synagogue, which had been abruptly shut down in July, must be restored to its legal tenant, Chabad of Krakow, and can be reopened to the Jewish community.

The good news comes less than a week before Rosh Hashanah, and, says its spiritual leader, Rabbi Eliezer Gurary, the community is grateful to be back in time for the High Holy Days.

The Izaak shul, which had become a hub for the local Jewish community over the last ten years, under the leadership of Rabbi Gurary, was forced to suspend its prayer services, Torah classes, and access to kosher food, among a host of other community activities that served both the local community and thousands of visitors to the city.

“We are thankful to learn of the Polish court’s decision that now restores to the Jewish community its lively activities at the historic Izaak Synagogue,” says Rabbi Yehuda Krinsky, chairman of Chabad-Lubavitch Headquarters. “Chabad’s spiritual, educational and social programming are profoundly enriching both to locals and visitors, and we look forward to seeing that Jewish life will continue to flourish here uninterruptedly, to the benefit of all of Krakow’s Jews.”

The July eviction of Chabad from the historic Izaak Synagogue made national headlines when armed guards barred entry to worshipers. The judge today ruled that the eviction was illegal and that the landlord, Tadeusz Jakubowicz, must allow them to resume services there.

Rabbi Gurary notified Lubavitch Headquarters this morning, that the keys to the synagogue have been returned and it is once again opened and in full operation.

“We’re glad to be back home, and plan on adding more communal programming and Torah classes than we had before,” says Gurary. “We hope to move forward in a peaceful fashion, working together with all parties, which will ultimately benefit all organizations here in Poland.”

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